From school to success

On June 21, the Transition Task Force released From School to Success: Clearing the Path.  The report contains 15 recommendations to help youth get the training and education they need to find meaningful employment in Nova Scotia.

Appointed by Education and Early Childhood Education Minister Karen Casey and Labour and Advanced Education Minister Kelly Regan last fall, the Transition Task Force is made up of educators, business and youth representatives—myself included. (See the photo of task force members in the header above.)

Recommendations from the task force include:

  • providing relevant career information to youth earlier
  • creating an entrepreneurial culture within schools, colleges and universities
  • helping more apprentices, college and university students complete their education and training, and to do so more quickly

I was honored to serve on the Transition Task Force that addressed some key issues in education that I am passionately committed to. Through the task force, I found a table of like-minded people engaged in discussing challenges and making recommendations of what can be done to provide enhanced opportunities for Nova Scotian youth.

I know first-hand how NSCAD, as a world renowned art school, can be accessible to young people coming from high school or transferring from other universities and the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) (through our innovative 2 + 2 programs). Sometimes debt adverseness can prevent some very talented students from considering a degree in art or design, but there is financial support available. NSCAD awards more than $311,000 in student support annually through bursaries and scholarships and also offers diverse employment opportunities for students on campus.

I believe one of the most important task force recommendations is to reach parents and students with financial planning information earlier so that they understand post-secondary education is worth the investment and remains the clearest path to a rewarding and good paying job. For example, the Nova Scotia government provides bursaries of approximately $1,200 a year for university students from Nova Scotia—although this significant direct tuition deduction is generally not well known.The task force also called for a review of current sources of financial assistance to students (from governments, universities, colleges, families and students themselves) and an assessment of what changes could be made to close the gap between costs and available resources.

Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey and Labour and Advanced Education Minister Kelly Regan accepted the report and thanked the task force members for our work.

“Our government is committed to seeing more young people find meaningful work here at home,” said Minister Regan. “Our budget this year is investing more than $12 million in programs that provide the skills, training and experience needed to connect young people to a career here in Nova Scotia.”

The province will report on progress throughout the year, as action is undertaken. The ministers also agreed to reconvene task force members in fall 2017 for a round table session to review and discuss progress.

The Transition Task Force was established as part of Nova Scotia’s Action Plan for Education. Ensuring youth have the best possible chance for a successful future in Nova Scotia is supported by the ONE Nova Scotia Coalition.

To close, I would like to share some profiles from the  Class of 2016. Read what NSCAD grads say about their art school experience and how it changed their lives.

NSCAD Pride and Kudos!

Dianne